World doctors (part 2 of 5)

Our couple had just graduated college as doctors and were ready to pursue their journey helping those who could not afford medical care.

The organization “world doctors,” was getting supplies ready for the trip to Rocho, where many injured people awaited¬† arrival. Rocho was well-known for horrific attacks on the people who lived there. The people were left with limbs missing, signs of torture, rape, and mutilation. The organization’s doctors had a lot to deal with. Trying to mend the broken was emotionally distressing when they seen the patients that came for medical help. World doctors had special counselors to help the patients and their staff with the impact of the wounds these people suffered.supplies.jpgmeds4.jpg

The time came to leave, Jacob and Sarah had said, “till we meet again to family and friends.” The doctors and organizers gathered together and boarded buses supplied by the army. Everyone arrived at an air strip and loaded all their supplies, food supplies, personal belongings and themselves into a large army plane. The ride was rough and long. Once the plane had reached the proper altitude everybody was allowed to move around the plane. The journey would take thirteen to fourteen hours to get there, so a nap could be taken if anyone wanted.bus.jpgplane.jpg

Hours had passed when outside the window of the airplane clouds billowed beneath the plane. The sight was so beautiful and quiet. The pilot had come on the intercom and told us that we were nearing our destination. There came a cheer from all the passengers as the flight so far was boring other than the conversations with each other. Everyone was pumped and ready for the landing and transport to the local hospital. The organization had prepared everyone for what they would be walking into. rooms.jpg

There were no new shiny operating rooms, no Special operating clothes, and not many beds to put patients in after their surgeries. This was a dirty baron place with only a minimal staff. One translator was in place for every eight doctors, that would cause challenges dealing with paper work and patient care. The rooms they had been assigned to where small cramped dark cell like rooms on the lower floors of the hospital. At night you could see the dead being wheeled into the morgue. “How depressing could that be waking up to the smell of dead bodies across the hall.” “Creepy.”deathh.jpgdeath

The team was on the ground and busy moving all the supplies and other items into two buses that were waiting for their arrival. There was a police presences that made their arrive uncomfortable, but this was the norm for this place. They were there to protect the team, and would escort them to the hospital. At the location of the hospital there were soldiers present. The outside of the hospital was a dingy yellow color that contrasted with the green uniforms of the soldiers. It looked like a very grim place to visit.  soliers2.jpgsoldiers.jpg

There where patients sitting and standing against the walls that were awaiting immediate care. There was just enough time to unload the buses and put their belongings into the rooms they were going to live in for the next few months. Locking their rooms they headed for the area that held their patients. The examining rooms were just a bed with a sheet covering it, no dividers, no curtains, no nothing. The tools on the stand beside the bed where old, dirty and rusty. Jacob could not even fathom the conditions the doctors would be operating under. hospital1.jpgprimative tools.jpgThe journey for this team of doctors was going to show them just how primitive hospitals where in other places.

Join me tomorrow and experience the emotions this team of doctors have to deal with in a poor country.

Thank you for dropping by.

Take care out there and be safe.

gran driving red  lips (2).jpgMAGS.

“Have a great Tuesday, and watch out for the kids going back to school”

I would like to thank all the fine photographers at upsplash for their contribution.

 

 

   

 

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